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Article
March 6, 1920

DIFFERENCES IN PATHOLOGY OF PANDEMIC AND RECURRENT FORMS OF SO-CALLED INFLUENZA

Author Affiliations

Director of Laboratories, Bellevue and Allied Hospitals WITH THE COLLABORATON OF MORRIS DINNERSTEIN, M.D., AND A. D. FROST, M.D. Pathologist and Pathologic Intern, Respectively, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK

JAMA. 1920;74(10):646-650. doi:10.1001/jama.1920.02620100006003
Abstract

In New York City the first recurrent epidemic of so-called influenza, now fortunately at an end, presented certain noteworthy differences from the pandemic disease which prevailed in the latter part of 1918. The recurrent disease, while it incapacitated thousands, pursued a milder course, complicating pneumonias were relately few, and the death rate, of course, did not approach the appalling figures of the previous eruption. On the other hand, the recurrent disease was characterized by a greater variety of pulmonary lesions—among other things, by concomitant semipurulent pleural exudates, by multiple pleural and subpleural abscesses, by frequent and extensive purulent invasion of the interlobar and interlobular septums of the lungs, by the formation of solitary, oftener multiple, discrete or confluent abscesses of the parenchyma, and by an extraordinary range of pneumonic lesions. The pathologic anatomy of the recurrent disease is important, not only from the standpoint of the diagnosis and treatment of

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