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Article
March 20, 1920

THE PATHS BY WHICH TETANUS TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN ARE SPREAD IN THE BODY

JAMA. 1920;74(12):806-807. doi:10.1001/jama.1920.02620120032017
Abstract

It has long been recognized that tetanus poison has a special affinity for the nervous system. More than twenty-five years ago, Bruschettini1 demonstrated that the toxin might be found in the nerves but not in the adjacent muscles and other tissues surrounding the point of subcutaneous injection. It is to Meyer and Ransome,2 however, that medical science owes the complete proof that the tetanus poison is absorbed from the blood and tissues by the peripheral nerves and transported centrad along their paths. For example, when tetanus toxin is injected into the thigh muscles of an experimental animal, the poison is found at first only in the sciatic nerve of the same side and in the blood.

The process by which this transport of the tetanus toxins occurs has been widely discussed. For some time it was believed that the lipoids, which are conspicuously abundant in nervous tissues, are

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