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Article
March 27, 1920

TORSION OF THE OMENTUMREPORT OF A CASE AND A BRIEF REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1920;74(13):881-882. doi:10.1001/jama.1920.02620130017007
Abstract

History.  —Mrs. B. F., aged 36, admitted to the Jewish Hospital, Sept. 4, 1919. complained of pain in the lower part of the chest and in the epigastrium. She gave a history of a similar attack, but not so severe, five weeks previously. This improved in two days, but tenderness in the abdomen had persisted up to the time of admission. The present pain began on August 28, and at first was chiefly in the mid-epigastrium, but later moved down until it was quite low in the abdomen and more severe in the right iliac region. The pain was mild for four days and aching in nature; then it became much more severe, becoming a constant "cramp-like" or "doubling-up" pain. The abdomen was very tender, and any motion of it produced intense pain. The patient had been nauseated throughout the entire illness, but vomiting, expulsive in nature, occurred only once,

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