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Article
September 2, 1922

ANTEPOSITION AND RETROPOSITION OF THE UTERUS: INCIDENCE AND SYMPTOMS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Medicine, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1922;79(10):793-794. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.02640100013004
Abstract

One thousand consecutive cases of unmarried women, aged from 15 to 45 years, who had no record of pelvic infection, pelvic tumor or pregnancy were studied to determine, if possible, the relative frequency with which the various displacements of the uterus and the attendant symptoms occur in cases in which no pathologic or physiologic factors could have affected the position of the uterus. Polak1 says that one woman in every five has retroversion, congenital or acquired. The cases in this series represent the congenital type.

In the series of 1,000 cases, retroposition of the uterus was found during routine examination in 202 (20.2 per cent.); this indicates that the ratio of 1 to 5 is constant in the congenital type. The diagnostician is often puzzled by the fact that the general examination of a patient may disclose a retroverted or retroflexed uterus without a history suggestive of a pelvic

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