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July 12, 1924

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN PRODUCTS OF METABOLISM AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN.
From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1924;83(2):81-84. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660020003002
Abstract

The cause of high blood pressure remains one of the most baffling problems in medicine. Ever since von Basch, in 1876, gave us a practical method of estimating blood pressure, every physician has been more or less interested in the subject of arterial hypertension. We have learned much about its frequency of occurrence, its varied symptomatology, its numerous complications and its association with many diseases. The critical student, however, must feel a sense of dissatisfaction with almost all the theories advanced to explain its genesis.

High protein diets, excess of epinephrin in the circulation and disturbances in sodium chlorid metabolism have been suggested as possible causes of arterial hypertension. While there is some evidence that these substances may be concerned in the production of high blood pressure, it is interesting to note that Strouse 1 found high protein diets to be without effect on the blood pressure of hypertensive patients;

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