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Article
July 12, 1924

SENSORY DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING SYMPATHECTOMY FOR ANGINA PECTORIS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the surgical department, Cincinnati General Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;83(2):114-117. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660020036014
Abstract

The patient on whom these studies were made was operated on by one of us (M. R. R.), June 7, 1923, the operation consisting in the removal of the entire left cervical sympathetic chain and first thoracic sympathetic ganglion (Fig. 1). His clinical record appears under Case 1 in the preceding article. His subsequent history, with particular reference to his sensory disturbances, is as follows:

During the eight days of his postoperative convalescence, he did not complain of, but had, on questioning, slight pain and discomfort in the region of the left temporomandibular joint. This occurred only when he opened his mouth widely, and he attributed it to an overstrain during the administration of the ether, or during the vomiting that followed the anesthetic. Dec. 17, 1923, he was again admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia. The pain in the left mandibular joint had persisted. Two

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