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Article
August 2, 1924

A NEW METHOD FOR THE REMOVAL OF FOREIGN BODIES IN THE EXTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL

Author Affiliations

Kansas City, Mo.

JAMA. 1924;83(5):357. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26610050003009d

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Abstract

A mother recently brought her daughter, aged 9, to me for the removal of a cherry seed in the right ear canal, which had been there for ten months.

Various attempts at removal during this time had failed, and the youngster was quite sensitive with regard to any manipulation about the ear. A smooth, round, large cherry pit could be seen, which entirely filled the auditory canal, and was movable, but stayed close to the drum. Sudden movement of the head produced dizziness and a slight nausea, but no nystagmus.

The mother's description of previous unsuccessful attempts to remove this foreign body induced me to try a new method. I dipped a camel's hair brush in liquid glue and held it firmly against the cherry pit for a minute or two. Apparently, the warmth of the ear canal prevented the glue from setting, as there was no cohesion whatever.

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