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Article
August 23, 1924

RECENT INVESTIGATIONS OF ABSORPTION AND EXCRETION OF LEAD IN THE ORGANISM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Laboratories of Physiology, Medical School of Harvard University, and the medical clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;83(8):588-592. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660080018005
Abstract

The poisoning caused by lead has been studied since very ancient times. During the last two or three centuries, plumbism has attracted particular interest because of its widespread occurrence. In 1616, Citois, a doctor from Poitiers, showed that the symptoms commonly known as the colic of Poitou were due to the use of bad wine treated with lead, and, in 1767, Sir George Bacon of England wrote an essay in which he traced the cause of so-called Devonshire colic to the use of lead in making cider. Stockhausen, about the middle of the seventeenth century, and several others, somewhat later, published excellent clinical descriptions of the disease, but the best and most accurate picture is that given by Tanquerel des Planches. His two volumes, published in 1834, contain material gathered from 1,200 cases of lead poisoning, and are so complete that later investigations have added little to the knowledge of

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