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Article
January 11, 1930

THE EXTRINSIC NERVOUS CONTROL OF THE LARGE BOWEL

JAMA. 1930;94(2):78-79. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710280006002
Abstract

What I have to present is not a completed piece of work. The literature on the extrinsic nervous control of the large bowel is contradictory. There is agreement on the point that the sacral sympathetic nerves carry motor fibers both to the circular and to the longitudinal musculature of the descending colon, the rectum, and possibly part of the transverse colon; but just where the sacral fibers cease to influence the transverse colon seems to be an open question.

There is disagreement as to the cecum, and the ascending and the proximal parts of the transverse colon. Some investigators assert that the nerve fibers from the hypogastric plexus and the hypogastric ganglion that reach the ascending and the proximal colon are inhibitory in function. Cannon makes the statement that the middle or the main portion of the transverse colon has no extrinsic nervous motor control.

We have investigated the problem

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