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Article
December 9, 1922

ACUTE SUFFOCATIVE EDEMA OF THE LUNGS IN RELATION TO DISEASES OF THE HEART

Author Affiliations

New York Consultant in Heart and Circulatory Diseases, Lincoln Hospital

JAMA. 1922;79(24):1996-1997. doi:10.1001/jama.1922.26420240001013

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Abstract

No one can practice medicine more than a short time without encountering people suffering from attacks characterized by edema of the lungs and great shortness of breath, followed in a short time by cough and expectoration. During the course of the attack, the lungs are filled with moist râles, which persist for several days, and then gradually disappear. There is generally a rise in temperature to about 100 F. and great prostration, the day after the attack.

However, the recovery from this condition is complete, and no traces of it are left. This trouble has been described as acute suffocative edema, and it is recognized as a condition apart from other diseases. It is, as a rule, considered part of a complicating kidney or heart condition.

If, during the attack, the heart happens to be overacting, the patient is often said to be suffering from dilatation of the heart. These

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