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Article
September 27, 1924

EFFECT OF TORREY'S PANCREATIC EXTRACT ("GLYCOSIN") AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR INSULIN

JAMA. 1924;83(13):975-976. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660130015005
Abstract

Since the discovery of insulin, diligent effort has been made to find other modes of administration than by hypodermic injection. Experiments have been made in giving insulin by mouth and by rubbing it into the

skin. While some effect can be secured in several of these ways, that effect has been relatively slight and always so inconstant as to exclude practical application of the method for the present. Probably the most hopeful results are contained in the reports of Murlin, Sutter, Allen and Piper,1 who gave insulin in combination with a weak acid in the form of enteric coated tablets. In the wake of these careful scientific studies,

there has been naturally a revival of the claims made for various nondescript preparations of pancreas. With these we are not concerned. They were tested years ago and found worthless, and the numerous testimonials sent out by their manufacturers are remarkable

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