[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 11, 1924

RURAL AND URBAN HEALTHA COMPARISON OF PHYSICAL DEFECTS IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS FROM RURAL AND URBAN DISTRICTS

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Students' Health Service and Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Minnesota Medical School.

JAMA. 1924;83(15):1117-1123. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660150001001
Abstract

Wood,1 after studying the results of the examinations of more than half a million school children, concluded that physical defects are greater in rural than in urban children. Dresslar,2 in 1912, made a survey of 1,500 country schools and reported that 60 per cent. had insufficient light, 66 per cent. had unsafe water, 50 per cent, used common drinking cups, and only 1 per cent. had sanitary toilets. Since 1910 in New York State the rural death rate has exceeded the urban rate. Draper,3 of the U. S. Public Health Service, says: "It is a well known fact that the natural advantages which the rural districts possess in favor of healthful existence are more than offset by the better health protection afforded the city dweller.... Malaria and hookworm are almost entirely of rural origin and there is much more typhoid and dysentery in the country than in

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×