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Article
January 25, 1930

THORACIC AND LUMBAR SYMPATHETIC GANGLIONECTOMY IN PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASESTHERAPEUTIC VALUE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Neurologic Surgery and the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1930;94(4):250-253. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710300022006
Abstract

With the advent of surgical procedures capable of producing arterial dilatation in the extremities, it becomes highly important clearly to define the types of vascular diseases that may be benefited by vasodilator measures. Considerable discrimination and caution should be employed in the selection of operable cases.

PRIMARY DISTURBANCES OF THE PERIPHERAL ARTERIES  Primary diseases of the arteries of the extremities can be classified in two main groups: (1) those of the vasomotor or functional nature, of which there are two types, vasoconstrictor disturbances (mild spastic attacks and Raynaud's disease) and vasodilator disturbances (erythromelalgia), and (2) those of organic disease of the arteries (thrombo-angiitis obliterans and arteriosclerosis with thrombosis).

Functional Vasoconstrictor Disturbances.  —It is obvious that the vasoconstrictor disturbance affecting the hands or feet should be permanently relieved by thoracic or lumbar sympathetic ganglionectomy. Raynaud's disease represents the most favorable group for operative relief. There are, of course, many cases of

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