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Article
October 18, 1924

THE TREATMENT OF CEREBRAL SPASTIC PARALYSISWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE STOFFEL OPERATION

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1924;83(16):1236-1240. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660160026008
Abstract

Cerebral spastic paralysis is a condition characterized by loss of muscle control, incoordination, increased reflexes, impaired mentality and deformities. This condition is of more common occurrence than is generally supposed; Sharp and MacClaire report1 that, in 13 per cent. of 100 consecutive deliveries, cerebral hemorrhage with spastic symptoms was present. That this is an extremely distressing condition will be conceded, nor will it be denied that any treatment or combination of treatments offering a hope of relief or improvement is worthy of trial.

This article is based on the study of ninety-two cases seen in the last three years in private practice and in the out-patient service. Of these ninety-two patients, thirty-nine had Stoffel operations performed on one or more nerves.

It is not my intention to enter into a lengthy discussion of the etiology, pathology and symptomatology of this condition, as this presentation mainly has to do with

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