[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.176.107. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 20, 1923

PROBLEMS CONCERNING INFECTIONS OF CERVIX, BODY OF UTERUS, AND FALLOPIAN TUBES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Pathologic Laboratory and Gynecologic Service, St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1923;80(3):161-162. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640300011004
Abstract

A dozen years ago, dilation and curettage was probably the most frequently performed gynecologic operation. This held true for the most prominent clinics as well as for less well known operating rooms. Not only was this a usual operation, but the reason assigned for scraping the uterus was most often a chronic infection, variously designated as chronic metritis, endometritis or leukorrhea.

Observance of the futility of this procedure, particularly its limited value in attempts to relieve discharges, stimulated in me a desire to learn something about chronic leukorrhea and chronic infections of the uterus. These efforts, in turn, eventually led to a study of diseased fallopian tubes.

THE PROBLEM OF CHRONIC ENDOMETRITIS  Four years ago a combined bacteriologic and histologic study was completed of 118 uteri removed to remedy various pathologic conditions.1 The greater part of the endometrium of these uteri was excised in its entire thickness down to

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×