[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 20, 1923

SPASMODIC FORCED RESPIRATION AS A SEQUEL OF EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS

Author Affiliations

Associate Physician, Neurological Institute; Instructor of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons NEW YORK

JAMA. 1923;80(3):178-179. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640300028011
Abstract

The protean character of the sequelae of epidemic (lethargic) encephalitis has come to be well recognized as evidence of its involvement of almost any part of the brain or spinal cord. Its syndromes are legion, and it bids fair to rival neurosyphilis as a waste basket for the vagaries of neurologic diagnosis.

During the last year, certain disturbances of the respiratory mechanism have come under my observation as a sequel to epidemic encephalitis, which have resulted clinically in disorders of breathing of a very bizarre nature. In each instance, the symptoms have conformed to the same general pattern, but there has been a different coloring as far as the individual respiratory difficulty was concerned.

We are all familiar with the dyspnea that accompanies respiratory or cardiovascular diseases, the toxemias and the well known Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Quite different in all their characteristics are those disorders of respiration to which encephalitis has

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×