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Article
October 25, 1924

A PRACTICAL DANGER IN THE USE OF INSULIN BY THE PATIENT AT HOME

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Loyola University School of Medicine CHICAGO
From the Department of Medicine, Loyola University School of Medicine and Mercy Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;83(17):1308-1309. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660170024009
Abstract

When insulin was first introduced as a therapeutic measure in the management of diabetes mellitus, it was deemed advisable that its administration be begun with the patient under hospital supervision. That this was and still is a wise and just precaution, should evoke no controversy. We are dealing with a powerful agent, and employing it to combat a condition that varies widely with each individual, thereby precluding the possibility of anything like a fixed dosage. With each case a law unto itself, it is essential that, through careful and painstaking analysis, the degree and severity of the disease be determined, and, by a study of its reaction and behavior to an adjusted diet and insulin, a safe dosage of the latter arrived at. This was found to be practical only in a well instituted hospital. Particularly was this so if, in addition, it was anticipated that insulin therapy might be

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