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Article
October 25, 1924

BENIGN FOREIGN BODY GIANT-CELL TUMORS IN THE LONG BONES

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1924;83(17):1323-1329. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660170039014
Abstract

In reviewing cases of bone tumors examined at the Mayo Clinic between 1909 and 1922, I have selected a group of twenty-four benign giant-cell tumors of the long bones for presentation. All of the patients were given careful clinical and roentgenographic examinations, were operated on, and had microscopic diagnoses made. The end-results were traced in 1924, from two to fifteen years after operation.

Consideration of this group may be of value in clearing up some of the confusion that apparently still exists under the misleading terminology of giant-cell sarcoma, giant-cell sarcoma of the epulis type, and chronic hemorrhagic osteomyelitis. Formerly considered malignant, this tumor has gradually become definitely placed among the benign, and it is regarded by many surgeons and pathologists as a normal attempt at repair following traumatic and low-grade infectious processes. In the group reported here, the microscopic findings are practically uniform; there has been no metastasis; the

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