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February 8, 1930

THE TREATMENT OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIA WITH SWINE STOMACH

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1930;94(6):388-390. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710320014004
Abstract

Castle and Locke 1 have demonstrated that meat fed to normal persons and recovered by vomiting, and then fed to patients with pernicious anemia, contains some material that produces the same effect on the blood of patients with pernicious anemia as that which was shown by Minot and Murphy to result from the administration of liver. Practically all cases of pernicious anemia are accompanied by achylia, and I2 have shown that approximately 26 per cent of a large series of relatives of patients suffering from pernicious anemia have achlorhydria.

Because of these facts, I decided to try the effect of feeding the raw and cooked stomach of a meat-producing animal to patients with pernicious anemia. By consultation with Mann and Feldman3 of the Mayo Foundation, it was found that the stomach of swine resembles the stomach of human beings much more closely than does that of bovine animals

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