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Article
November 29, 1924

AN APPARATUS FOR THE INFUSION OF PHYSIOLOGIC SODIUM CHLORID SOLUTION

Author Affiliations

Chicago Junior Surgeon, St. Luke's Hospital

JAMA. 1924;83(22):1767. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26610220002014e
Abstract

It is a usual experience to have a great deal of trouble in the common matter of the infusion of physiologic sodium chlorid solution. The gravity method in common use, an inverted flask with one glass tube to let the air in and a second to let the solution out, is subject to various accidents, particularly when an inexperienced person holds the flask. Not uncommonly the stopper comes out, spilling the contents over whatever is beneath, wasting time and perhaps sacrificing what chance there may be of benefit to the patient. Again, a long rubber tube is needed to give sufficient weight to the column of water for it to force itself into the tissues. This long tube is subject to leaks, loose connections and accidental jerks. Furthermore, two persons are needed, one to hold the flask and the other to use the needles. The flow is of necessity slow

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