[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 13, 1924

TREATMENT OF SHOCK WITH GLUCOSE INFUSIONS AND INSULIN

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE
From the surgical service of the National Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;83(24):1906-1908. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02660240020005
Abstract

Shock or exhaustion may be produced by various causes, such as fear, worry, trauma, physical injury, toxins, infection, hemorrhage, excessive muscular exertion, starvation and insomnia. The exact mechanism or physicochemical changes taking place in the production of shock are unknown. The theories explaining this are legion, and need not be detailed here, except to mention briefly that the blame has been laid to capillary distention, dilatation of the splanchnic vessels, fat embolism and absorption of toxins from traumatized tissues. Whatever the cause or mechanism may be, the clinical pictures seem to be identical. When we consider the histologic pathology of shock, we are on a little firmer ground. The organs of the body especially involved in shock are the thyroid, suprarenals, brain, liver and muscles. This constitutes, figuratively speaking, our kinetic system, which contains potential energy delivered as a result of environmental stimuli. Crile1 has shown histologically, working with

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×