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Article
December 13, 1924

VINCENT'S ANGINA OCCURRING IN A PATIENT UNDER TREATMENT FOR SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

Hollywood, Calif.

JAMA. 1924;83(24):1919. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.26610240001011b

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Abstract

Despite the fact that Vincent's angina is a local disease, in the sense that there is no spirochetemia, there are many clinicians who supplement the topical treatment with intravenous injections of the arsphenamins.

The case here reported is of interest, occurring, as it did, in a patient who was receiving an intramuscular injection of 0.4 gm. of sulpharsphenamin at short intervals, and no mercury. If the arsphenamins are of value when exhibited in any manner except locally, should not the comparatively high body saturation reached after the third injection protect the individual against Vincent's disease? I have seen a similar instance once, but there the diagnosis was less clean cut, because of the possibility of a bismuth stomatitis.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —A single woman, aged 31, seen through the courtesy of Drs. Frank Chandler and Fred Bricker, admitted numerous exposures and the development of a primary lesion two months

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