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Article
January 3, 1925

POINT OF VIEW OF THE INTERNIST IN THE STUDY OF CANCER

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine, Ohio State University College of Medicine COLUMBUS, OHIO

JAMA. 1925;84(1):8-10. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660270012003
Abstract

The function of the family physician and internist in the study of cancer may be described as that of a liaison officer between the laity on the one hand and the pathologist, surgeon and radiologist on the other.

He is best able to obtain the patient's reaction to educational efforts.

On his skill, judgment and tact hinges the question as to when the patient receives diagnosis and treatment.

Much emphasis has been placed on the need of complete histories in the examination of patients. This requirement in diagnosis is most important in the detection of early cancer. The tendency among interns, senior students and internists is to give the patient little opportunity to express his own ideas of his case. Probably the majority of physicians obtain comprehensive histories by the Socratic method of question and answer. But how often is the patient given the opportunity to tell his past and

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