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Article
March 1, 1930

RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE ALLERGY RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR THE STUDY OF ALLERGY

Author Affiliations

Palo Alto, Calif.
Chicago.

JAMA. 1930;94(9):654-655. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710350054028

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —The following report from the Research Council is endorsed for publication by the Executive Council of the Association for the Study of Allergy.Ray M. Balyeat, M.D., Oklahoma City.Harry S. Bernton, M.D., Washington, D. C.William W. Duke, M.D., Kansas City, Mo.Richard A. Kern, M.D., Philadelphia.Albert H. Rowe, M.D., San Francisco.George Piness, M.D., Los Angeles, Chairman.Warren T. Vaughan, M.D., Richmond, Va.,Secretary.Antiallergic therapy is a carefully thought out and conscientious attempt to apply current immunologic theories to the prevention, alleviation and cure of hereditary and acquired hypersensitiveness and allied clinical conditions.Statistics show that no immunologic theory of the past three decades has been more than 5 per cent clinically efficient (Manwaring, W. H., and Krueger, A. P.: Laboratory-Endorsed Therapeutic Agents, The

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