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Article
April 28, 1923

THE DETERMINATION OF PHENOLSULPHONEPHTHALEIN EXCRETION IN THE PRESENCE OF HEMATURIA

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn
From the Brooklyn Hospital.

JAMA. 1923;80(17):1216-1217. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.26430440001009a
Abstract

The importance of the phenolsulphonephthalein test for kidney function, and its relative simplicity of performance, are now well appreciated by all whose work includes diagnosis of the various nephropathies. More recent work1 indicating that lowered excretion of phenolsulphonephthalein is practically always the first evidence of renal damage, functional or organic, only enhances its value to the clinician. It is obvious, therefore, that any factor which may inhibit successful use of the test in the presence of certain of the various nephropathies offers a serious handicap. One of the most frequent and objectionable hindrances to the satisfactory use of the dye is the presence of blood in the urine. Another is a urine of high color.2

Burwell and Jones3 recently offered a method for rendering the urine free from blood and bile. Previously there had been no successful method for removing the blood pigment without altering the phenolsulphonephthalein

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