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Scientific Discovery and the Future of Medicine
June 23/30, 2015

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and the Development of Vaccines

Author Affiliations
  • 1Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
  • 2Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
  • 3Department of Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
JAMA. 2015;313(24):2419-2420. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.2427

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects 2.5 million people worldwide and accounts for more than 1 million deaths every year. Thus, an HIV vaccine is desperately needed. One roadblock to development of an effective HIV vaccine is the extraordinary ability of HIV to mutate and evolve into myriad quasi-species. Therefore, a key goal in developing a successful HIV vaccine is the induction of antibodies that can recognize and neutralize the majority of HIV quasi-species, called broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). The search for an HIV vaccine has led to a greater understanding of bnAbs.

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