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Article
May 12, 1923

SPONTANEOUS RUPTURE OF THE HEART IN A CASE OF ULCERATIVE ENDOCARDITIS

Author Affiliations

Clinical Professor of Medicine, George Washington University Medical School; Physician, Garfield and Tuberculosis Hospitals WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1923;80(19):1371-1372. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02640460021008
Abstract

Spontaneous rupture of the heart, though a rare occurrence, has many examples in literature. To Harvey is attributed the first observation of a case, and Morgagni himself, who wrote much on the subject, strangely enough succumbed to this unusual accident. George II of England also died from a tear in the wall of the right ventricle. The history of this case is so typical and is so quaint in its wording that I make a short quotation from Dr. Frank Nicholl's1 report: "About seven o'clock in the morning a noise was somewhere heard, as if a large billet had fallen down, and upon inquiry His Majesty was found fallen down on the ground, speechless and motionless. He appeared to have come from his necessary stool and as if going to his escritoir." An attempt was made to let blood, but the king did not revive. At the necropsy an

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