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Article
May 12, 1923

A CASE OF PHARYNGEAL DIPHTHERIA PROBABLY DUE TO AUTO-INFECTION FROM A DIPHTHERIC LESION OF THE THUMB

Author Affiliations

Baltimore
From the Department of Epidemiology, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1923;80(19):1375. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.26430460002010a
Abstract

A physician, aged 30, a graduate student, gave a positive reaction to the Schick test, Oct. 10, 1922. There was a very slight pseudoreaction. There was no history of previous diphtheria.

October 25, he carried out a virulence test with a culture from a known clinical case of diphtheria. At this date, he had not himself been in contact with a known clinical case for some time; nor had he been working with any other diphtheria cultures. While inoculating the guinea-pig, he pricked the skin on the dorsum of the terminal phalanx of the left thumb with the needle of a syringe containing the suspension from a twenty-four hour Loeffler slant. The suspension in the syringe was from a culture from the above mentioned case, and caused typical diphtheric lesions in the guinea-pig. October 29, the patient visited the laboratory and examined the inoculated animal, but after this date he

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