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Article
March 29, 1930

THE FUNCTION AND FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

JAMA. 1930;94(13):911-915. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710390009004
Abstract

In 1847 the American Medical Association was organized, listened to reports on the deplorable conditions in medical education, and adopted resolutions suggesting improvements. Like most resolutions, these had but little effect. Americans are much given to adopting resolutions on all sorts of subjects, promptly forgetting the matter and taking it for granted that the adoption of a resolution is synonymous with action. In 1902 the American Medical Association was reorganized on a purely democratic basis. Since that time it has functioned efficiently for the benefit of the American public and for the advancement of medical science.

THE MEDICAL COLLEGES  Among the first acts of the House of Delegates of the reorganized American Medical Association was the establishment of the Council on Medical Education. The Council was not merely a round-table conference which cogitated wearily on the deficiencies in American medical education; it was a functioning organization. It accumulated data concerning

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