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Article
April 11, 1925

CLINICAL APPLICATION OF THE BROMSULPHALEIN TEST FOR HEPATIC FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL; BALTIMORE
From the Department of Pharmacology, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, and the Royal Victoria Hospital.

JAMA. 1925;84(15):1112-1114. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660410020008
Abstract

Since the introduction, three years ago, of a method of estimating hepatic function by determining the rate of removal of phenoltetrachlorphthalein from the blood stream,1 this procedure has been widely used in the clinic. Sufficient experience has been gained to indicate that this method affords several improvements over the classic liver function tests. First, it is specific, and, if properly performed, abnormal results have invariably meant a disturbance in hepatic function. The specificity of a test is a valuable requisite and greatly enhances the clinical reliance that may be placed on it. Secondly, it is comparatively free from technical error and is not difficult to perform. Thirdly, it affords a quantitative measurement of the severity of impaired function. This has been proved experimentally, and clinically it is evidenced in studying cases of acute liver disease (catarrhal and arsphenamin jaundice and eclampsia), in which successive stages of functional repair may

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