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Article
July 21, 1923

A CASE OF IRITIS AND ONE OF CORNEAL ULCER CURED BY TONSILLECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Atlanta, Ga. Visiting Ophthalmologist, Georgia Baptist Hospital

JAMA. 1923;81(3):211. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.26510030003013a

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Abstract

Mrs. M. D. S., aged 20, housewife, consulted me, June 8, 1922, for a corneal ulcer of the right eye complicated by severe iritis. Physical examination was negative except for the eye trouble and a bad chronic tonsillitis. The Wassermann blood tests and urinalysis were negative. In December, 1920, I had advised tonsillectomy for the chronic tonsillitis found then. At that time I also noted some faint corneal scars in the right eye, and learned that four years previously this patient had been many weeks under treatment for corneal ulcer. For three weeks the usual methods of treatment were tried, with little real improvement. Believing the tonsillitis to be the cause of the eye inflammation, I again urged operation. The tonsils, on removal, showed many crypts filled with cheesy and purulent material. Within twenty-four hours the pain, the photophobia and the ciliary congestion were all greatly lessened, and within a

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