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Article
September 22, 1923

IRON IN RELATION TO ANEMIA AND OTHER DISORDERS

JAMA. 1923;81(12):1022-1023. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650120054013
Abstract

There are types of anemias in which the origin of the disorder is so obvious that it calls for no unusual sagacity to manage the situation. Hemorrhages of all sorts are certain to lead to a "dilution" of the blood, for a time at least, provided the bleeding has been sufficiently extensive. Sometimes the hemorrhage is external and evident, while in other cases it is occult in character so that the escape of blood from the blood vessels is not betrayed so readily; but in either event the restoration of the circulation through regeneration of an adequate supply of corpuscles and hemoglobin is likely to go on uneventfully if no peculiar disease manifestations interfere with the normal progress of restitution. Hematogenesis is subject, however, to the same limitations that attach to all processes of growth. Formation of cells and tissues cannot exceed the supply of the essential component of the

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