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Article
November 10, 1923

SENSORY STIMULATION AND THE EPINEPHRIN OUTPUT OF THE SUPRARENALS

JAMA. 1923;81(19):1610. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650190040016
Abstract

The suprarenal glands have a supply of sympathetic nerve fibers that come to them by way of the splanchnic nerves. Through direct stimulation of these fibers, the output of epinephrin from the glands appears to be increased. This observation, which seems to have been fairly well established for some time, has become the basis for the assumption that the discharge of the potent hormone of the suprarenals into the circulation is regulated through definite secretory nerve fibers. It has furthermore involved a very natural step to expect that, in view of this apparently well arranged neuro-secretory mechanism, impulses of varied sorts, initiated through sensory channels or starting from central nervous agencies, should affect markedly the "secretion" or discharge of epinephrin. Consequently, it has been asserted and widely taught that sensory stimulations of various kinds, strong emotional excitement and other conditions cause a reflex stimulation of the suprarenals resulting in an

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