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May 31, 1930

URINARY CALCULI IN INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD

Author Affiliations

Urologist, Babies' and New York Nursery and Child's Hospitals; Adjunct Urologic Surgeon, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK
From the Children's Medical and Surgical Divisions, the Departments of Pathology and Urology, Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1930;94(22):1753-1757. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02710480029010
Abstract

Because persistent pyuria is the outstanding symptom when urinary stone is present in infants and children, chronic pyelitis is the usual diagnosis; the time honored urinary antiseptics are administered; the disease progresses. While it has been my good fortune to collect for study from one institution a series of thirty juvenile cases of urinary calculi, my purpose here is not only to present a clinical summary of this group but also and more particularly to emphasize that (1) chronic pyuria rarely means uncomplicated renal infection, and (2) pyuria that still persists after four weeks of intensive medical treatment clearly warrants a complete urologic examination. Failure to subject patients with chronic pyuria to complete urologic examination (or even to a plain roentgenogram of the urinary tract) accounts for the rarity with which, in the past, urinary stones have been disclosed during the early years of life.

INCIDENCE AND ETIOLOGY  The incidence

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