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Article
December 8, 1923

THE RELATION OF SPECIFIC GRAVITY TO GLYCOSURIA IN DIABETIC AND NONDIABETIC CASES

JAMA. 1923;81(23):1939-1940. doi:10.1001/jama.1923.02650230023005

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Abstract

This study was suggested by the realization that too frequently in a case of suspected diabetes the general practitioner gives a negative opinion based solely on the fact that a rapid routine examination of the urine has shown a specific gravity below 1.030. Taking it for granted that if the urine contains sugar the specific gravity must be above that figure, he does not consider it necessary to make a urinary sugar test.

Laboratory experience has shown, however, that sugar can be present in urine of a low specific gravity; but whether this was a rare or a frequent

occurrence I did not know, and for that reason the investigation reported here was undertaken. In 1,000 cases of glycosuria, the specific gravity was compared with the urine sugar content, the cases being classified according to the specific gravity (Table 1). Chart 1 shows that as one would expect, the percentage

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