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Article
February 9, 1924

INSULIN AS AN INVESTMENT FOR THE PATIENT WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

JAMA. 1924;82(6):435-438. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650320005002
Abstract

A broad-minded physician conserves the money as well as the health of his patients; in a sense, he is a trustee both of their bodily welfare and of their finances. In other words, a physician is not justified in prevailing on sick people to go to a great expense for diagnostic tests or therapeutic procedures which are unnecessary or of theoretical interest; rather must he advise those measures which are as safe and certain as possible and which offer the prospect, through relieved symptoms, of a good return for the financial investment involved.

This point of view is particularly sound when applied to the insulin situation. Owing to its widespread publicity in the lay and medical press, physicians are constantly tempted by diabetic patients of all sorts to give their cases a trial with the new preparation. There is no doubt as to the efficiency of the remedy in many

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