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JAMA Clinical Evidence Synopsis
July 7, 2015

Long-term vs Short-term Therapy With Vitamin K Antagonists for Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Vascular Medicine, University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
  • 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
JAMA. 2015;314(1):72-73. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.2693
Abstract

Clinical Question  Is long-term (≥3 months) vs short-term therapy with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) associated with differences in the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), major bleeding, and mortality in patients with symptomatic VTE?

Bottom Line  Long-term treatment with VKAs is associated with a reduced risk for recurrent VTE and an increased risk for major bleeding compared with short-term treatment in patients with VTE, but is not associated with differences in mortality.

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