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Article
July 12, 1930

PHYSIOLOGIC FACTORS IN THE CONQUEST OF HIGH ALTITUDES

JAMA. 1930;95(2):115-116. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720020031013
Abstract

Life at high altitudes involves the possible effects of a number of environmental factors that are not active during residence at the lower levels to which most persons are accustomed. Foremost is the lowered barometric pressure and the consequently diminished oxygen tension of the inspired air. There are other features that often obtrude themselves into a stay far above the sea level; among them may be a generally lowered humidity, low temperatures, altered solar radiation, and wind velocities. Interest in the physiologic responses to the conditions at high altitudes has been intensified in recent years, particularly in view of the growing importance of aviation in peace as well as in war, in commerce no less than in exploration. Transfer to an environment of lowered oxygen tension promptly brings about a series of compensatory manifestations in the organism. Most conspicuous is the change in the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. There

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