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March 15, 1924

THE USE OF ARSPHENAMIN AND ITS DERIVATIVES ADMINISTERED BY RECTUMA CLINICAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND
From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the Western Reserve University and of the Cleveland City Hospital.

JAMA. 1924;82(11):868-870. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650370036011
Abstract

As early as 1912, Schamberg, Kolmer and Raiziss 1 reported the results of a series of experimental studies on the administration of arsphenamin (salvarsan) by mouth to animals and man. In their work it was definitely demonstrated that arsphenamin (arsenobenzol) is absorbed into the blood following such administration: "By the fact that a distinct destructive influence on the trypanosomes in the blood of experimentally infected animals is exerted, evidences that such absorption takes place." They also state that about one-tenth the dose required in solution by mouth produces an equivalent effect intravenously, and that it may be given in doses of 30 mg. three times a day without producing any disturbing symptoms except mild digestive distress. However, the oral administration of arsphenamin exerts a much less vigorous curative effect on the lesions of syphilis than when given intravenously. They concluded it less advisable to give arsphenamin by mouth because the

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