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Article
July 26, 1930

PERFORATION OF THE DUODENUM AND LIVER BY A FISHBONE

JAMA. 1930;95(4):265-266. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.27210040002009a
Abstract

A recent editorial comment in The Journal1 mentioned an article by Carl Bearse,2 who reported three perforations of the intestine by a fishbone. In these two publications it was stated that the perforation usually occurred in the large intestine and that it may be impossible to make a diagnosis, as little or no shadow of the fishbone is shown by the roentgen ray. These comments should make a report of the following case of some interest, as the clinical observations differed materially.

REPORT OF CASE  Mrs. M. M., aged 36, admitted to St. Luke's Hospital, Dec. 16, 1929, was a native of Spain and spoke no English, her history, which made a diagnosis of acute gallbladder disease probable, being obtained through an interpreter. There was elevation of temperature, a high leukocyte count, and marked pain and tenderness and a mass in the right hypochondrium. A cholecystogram was taken

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