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Article
January 16, 1926

INJECTION OF THE SCIATIC NERVE AS SUBSTITUTE FOR FEMORAL PERIARTERIAL SYMPATHECTOMY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; LOANDA, ANGOLA, PORTUGUESE WEST AFRICA

JAMA. 1926;86(3):191-192. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670290031012
Abstract

Few operative procedures have aroused more interest in recent years than has periarterial sympathectomy. This operation, devised by Leriche and having as its principle vasodilation following stripping of the adventitia of the main artery of the part, is still the object of trial and speculation.

Many anatomists and surgeons are at variance with the theory that a large part of the vasomotor nerve fibers course to the arterioles and capillaries of the extremities within the adventitia of the parent arteries. Langley1 resected the lumbar sympathetic ganglions in cats and secured vasodilatation in the extremities, which was abolished when the sciatic and crural nerves were severed. Kramer and Todd2 studied the distribution of the vasomotor fibers to the arm, and Potts3 made a similar study of the innervation of the blood vessels of the leg with similar conclusions—that the nerve fibers are supplied to the blood vessels at

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