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Article
April 5, 1924

PASSIVE PULMONARY SENSITIZATIONITS BEARING ON THE ORIGIN OF ANTIBODIES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine; STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIF.

JAMA. 1924;82(14):1104-1105. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650400014004
Abstract

An important unsolved problem in immunology is the identification of the organs or tissues responsible for the formation of immune hormones or antibodies. The identification of these tissues may conceivably lead to successful therapeutic methods in diseases in which the essential antibodies do not appear in the circulating blood in sufficient quantities for successful serum treatment.

The identification of these tissues has been attempted by numerous workers. Various tissues have been removed surgically from experimental animals, or destroyed in these animals by physical or chemical agents, and the animal's power to produce antibodies has been compared with that of normal controls. No organ or tissue has thus far been found, however, whose removal or destruction will prevent the formation of antibodies, or reduce antibody formation sufficiently to warrant the conclusion that the organ or tissue in question is the essential or sole site of antibody formation.

Since not all tissues

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