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Article
January 30, 1926

BACTERIA IN MUSCULAR TISSUES AND BLOOD OF APPARENTLY NORMAL ANIMALSA PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Hygiene and Bacteriology, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1926;86(5):325-326. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670310007003
Abstract

A number of investigations to determine whether or not bacteria are normally present in the tissues of apparently healthy animals were reported before 1912, principally by German workers, but very few reports on this type of work are recorded in the literature of more recent years. Many early workers1 thought that the tissues of healthy animals are sterile. Messner,2 in 1910, found no bacteria in 145 samples of flesh of normal slaughter animals. Zwick and Weichel,3 in 1911, examined seventy-seven samples of muscle, liver, spleen and kidney of cattle and hogs. Of eight liver samples, six were positive, and only one muscle sample among fifty-nine tested contained bacteria. All other samples were sterile. In 1912, Grunt4 found only 2 per cent, of 540 muscle samples to contain bacteria.

Other workers have obtained contrary results. Thus Boni,5 in 1901, examined the lungs of twenty hogs for

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