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Article
August 9, 1930

ACUTE PNEUMOCOCCUS ENDOCARDITIS FOLLOWING EXTRACTION OF TEETH

Author Affiliations

New Haven, Conn.

JAMA. 1930;95(6):409. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.27210060004011b
Abstract

When one considers the enormous number of teeth that are extracted yearly in the United States because of focal infection, it is surprising that serious complications are not more commonly found. It is known, however, that the removal of infected teeth per se or as the source of focal infection may give rise to serious complications.

Blumer1 has classified the different types of fatal lesions that may result from tooth infection as follows:

  1. Direction extension of the local inflammatory process with spreading inflammation, which may even invade the mediastinum, and death from toxemia.

  2. Metastasis to neighboring tissues, such as occurs in cases of meningitis or thrombosis of the cerebral sinuses following tooth extraction.

  3. General septicemia or septicopyemia, which may terminate in: (a) acute septicemia with or without endocarditis; (b) chronic septicemia with degenerative processes in the internal organs, or (c) prolonged septicopyemia with the formation of abscesses.

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