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Article
August 16, 1930

MENINGITIS IN FILIPINOS ON AMERICAN SHIPS FROM THE ORIENT

JAMA. 1930;95(7):537-538. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720070075017
Abstract

Attention has previously been directed in these columns to the prevalence of meningitis on the Pacific Coast.1 Geiger2 has recently summarized the available knowledge, and further comment may be pertinent as to the transportation of cases from the orient and their development en route. President Hoover's executive order of June 21, 1929, and the regulations of the U. S. Public Health Service made effective in July of the same year drastically reduced the steerage capacity 75 per cent. Subsequently this capacity was increased to 50 per cent and has since remained unchanged. Not more than one transportation company was actually involved. This company specialized in transporting Filipinos and, as Geiger has shown, the racial susceptibility was high to the causative strains. Curiously, little if any meningitis has been reported from the Philippines (only three cases and two deaths in the Filipino concentration quartel for embarkation). This has led

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