[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 13, 1926

THE STRUCTURE OF PROTEINS AND OF LIVING TISSUES

JAMA. 1926;86(11):753-754. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670370023012
Abstract

It is now a score of years since Emil Fischer made his great contribution to our knowledge of the nature of proteins, showing that they are constructed, at least in part, of chains of amino-acids united to one another by their basic and acid radicals, forming the so-called peptids. This construction had already been suggested by Hofmeister, but it was Fischer who first really proved it by finding such peptids among the products of incomplete cleavage of proteins, by producing such polypeptids by synthetic means, and by showing that these synthetic peptids are digested by trypsin and erepsin.5 Following these discoveries, it was generally thought for a time that proteins consisted of great series of such chains of amino-acids, containing varying numbers of the score of amino-acids known to occur in proteins, in different proportions and groupings. Many of the properties of proteins are compatible with such a structure,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×