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May 31, 1924

SOME CHANGES IN THE CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS OF THE BLOOD FOLLOWING A MARATHON RACEWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF HYPOGLYCEMIA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the medical clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the department of biologic chemistry of the Medical School of Harvard University.

JAMA. 1924;82(22):1778-1779. doi:10.1001/jama.1924.02650480034015
Abstract

Last year we 1 studied a group of runners who participated in the American marathon race of 25 miles, which takes place annually in Boston, April 19. In general, it was found that men who had been doing long distance running for many years did not develop hypertrophy of the heart as indicated by roentgen-ray examination. Furthermore, directly after the race, the heart was found to be somewhat contracted rather than dilated. The vital capacity of the lungs was measured and did not seem to bear any particular relation to the running ability of the contestants, and on the average it was not increased over the normal figure for men who live comparatively nonathletic lives.

This year the usual distance of 25 miles was extended to 26 miles and 385 yards, the occasion being the final Olympic tryout. The examinations this year were made to see what changes occurred in

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