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Article
April 10, 1926

OCCURRENCE OF THROAT INFECTIONS WITH STREPTOCOCCUS SCARLATINAE WITHOUT A RASH

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1926;86(15):1110-1112. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670410006003
Abstract

During the winter of 1924 and 1925, an epidemic of hemolytic streptococcus infection occurred in the Presbyterian Hospital. The infections were prevalent among the nursing staff as well as among the patients admitted to the wards, and consisted chiefly of scarlatina, acute throat infections and infections of wounds. This epidemic has afforded the opportunity to study two phases of streptococcus infections: first, the infection of wounds by individuals who chronically carry hemolytic streptococci in the nose and throat, and, second, the etiology of cases of acute tonsillitis and pharyngitis occurring among contacts with scarlatinal patients. We will confine this report to the study of the streptococci obtained from the throats of the nurses with scarlet fever and acute streptococus throat infections, since the material relevant to wound infection is to be published elsewhere.1

All the cases reported occurred among the nursing staff, which was housed in one building. The

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