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Article
August 30, 1930

SENSORY DISTURBANCES FOLLOWING OPERATIONS ON THE KIDNEYI. POST-TRAUMATIC STATE OF TWELFTH INTERCOSTAL NERVE SIMULATING URETERAL PAIN

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Department of Surgery, University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1930;95(9):652-655. doi:10.1001/jama.1930.02720090014005
Abstract

Minor sensory disturbances in the loin following surgical intervention are exceedingly common postoperative annoyances: they will be considered in detail in a later report. A less common but more troublesome occurrence is the result of trauma to the twelfth intercostal nerve producing severe postoperative pain which may closely resemble the initial complaint. Such sequelae have been inadequately dealt with in the urologic literature, and we shall consider this symptomcomplex here.

The commonly accepted interpretation of visceral pain is that advanced by Head.1 The impulse produced by a painful stimulus to an internal organ is conducted by the autonomic nervous system to those segments of the cord in which that particular organ is represented. There it comes in close connection with the fibers for painful sensation from the surface of the body which arise from the same segments. But the ability to localize stimuli on the surface of the body

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