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Article
May 15, 1926

SAVING TIME IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL

Author Affiliations

STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIF.

JAMA. 1926;86(20):1498. doi:10.1001/jama.1926.02670460006002
Abstract

With the introduction into premedical and medical courses of those subjects requisite for a proper understanding of modern medicine, there has been a prolongation of the training period for the degree of Doctor of Medicine to a point that is approaching the upper limit of reasonable requirement.

As physics and chemistry were introduced into the premedical curriculum, and experimental physiology, laboratory bacteriology and practical pathology found their way into the day to day work of the medical school, the necessary clinical training was pushed forward. This, based on the traditional and ridiculous "four-system" of American education, meant four years of high school, four years of college, and four years of medical school. When additional training of a practical sort was added to this, the medical student before he actually met the problems of practice had passed out of the stage when it is easy to train his senses and his

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